Idealism: the hell & necessity

1

Ideals must burn low and long and locally.  Lincoln was my kind of idealist. He understood the hell in his own idealism.

2

Lincoln thought the winning ideals in 1783 and 1865 were the same, though few on the winning sides would have agreed on the ideals or were even idealists.

3

The moderation I want is not a Hegelian dialectical synthesis. It is the test of ideals through subordination and patience.

4

Eschatology – the ultimate ideal – leads to moderation, so Kierkegaard’s Knight of Faith is a tax collector, unrecognized.

5

An ideal eschatology leads not to fanaticism but moderation. “Let your moderation be known to all men. The Lord is at hand.” – Phil. 4:5

6

After the cock crew, Peter’s idealism was sublimated into moderation. He became “a new creation.”

7

Only a few idealists have the highest moderation, but no one else does.

8

Moderation may be an idealist’s highest ideal, subordinating her other ideals to the rule of reason.

By Peter

After stints as a trial lawyer and a church worker, Peter Stephens has settled in as a Virginia high school English teacher. Peter has read several books and poems. He wrote none of the posts below filed under "Passages." Click the link at the end of each post to see it in the context of the author's original post.