Or maybe “I saw you” outweighs “under the fig tree” for Nathanael (John 1:48-51). Maybe it outweighs the subsequent “you will see”‘s for Nathaniel, too, though probably not in the long run.

Evangelicals put such emphasis on knowing the Lord.  Yet

No longer need they teach one another, neighbour or brother, to know the Lord; all of them, high and low alike, will know me, says the Lord, for I shall forgive their wrongdoing, and their sin I shall call to mind no more.  (Jeremiah 31:34, REB)

The Bible seems to put a bigger emphasis on God seeing or knowing us:

O LORD, You have searched me and known me. You know when I sit down and when I rise up; You understand my thought from afar. You scrutinize my path and my lying down, And are intimately acquainted with all my ways. (Psalm 139:1-3, NNAS)

When the day comes, many will say to me, “Lord, Lord, did we not prophesy in your name, drive out demons in your name, and in your name perform many miracles?” Then I will tell them plainly, “I never knew you. Out of my sight; your deeds are evil!” (Matthew 7:22-23 – REB)

But now that you have come to know God, or rather to be known by God… (Galatians 4:9 – NNAS)

Now I know in part; but then shall I know even as also I am known. (1 Corinthians 13:12 – KJV)

If anyone fancies that he has some kind of knowledge, he does not yet know in the true sense of knowing. But if anyone loves God, he is known by God. (1 Corinthians 8:3 – REB)

Maybe, like Nathanael, I must be seen so I can see or even start to want to see. Perhaps I must be known so I can know.